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Volunteers create new Chorlton woodland

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March 6th 2012

Hard-working eco volunteers have worked with environmental regeneration initiative Red Rose Forest and Trees for Cities to create a new area of community woodland in Chorlton.

School pupils, local residents, staff from Manchester businesses, and students from Manchester University have all taken part in a series of volunteering events at Parkway Playing Fields at Merseybank off Princess Parkway.

More than 40 people turned up for a community planting day while pupils from St Ambrose RC Primary School, employees from Network Rail, Umbro and News International, and student volunteers have also taken part in planting events. In all, 108 volunteers took part in efforts to create the new woodland. 

Red Rose Forest, Greater Manchester's Community Forest, is currently working with Manchester City Council and environmental charity Trees for Cities to plant 2,000 new trees at the disused playing fields. The new woodland includes native species such as oak, ash, birch, wild cherry, alder and hazel.

Red Rose Forest project officer, Vicky King said: "The community planting day saw a great turn out from local residents and even people who had come from further afield. We were helped by some lovely early spring weather. We've also had fantastic support from the Manchester business community, St Ambrose Primary School and the students from Manchester University. Many hands make light work!

"Everyone has worked really hard on the project and as a result we've made huge progress on improving this area of green space. Thanks to their efforts this new woodland will be an asset to the local community for years to come. The trees, of course, look small at the moment but within a few years, as they grow into maturity, they'll create a green oasis for people to use for leisure and recreation.

"They'll bring other benefits too - such as shielding houses from traffic noise and pollution, reducing the risk of flooding and limiting the effects of climate change by providing shading and cooling in the summer."

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The new woodland at Parkway Playing Fields is a joint project between Red Rose Forest, international charity Trees for Cities as well as Manchester City Council which owns the land.

Millie Brown, regional and international co-ordinator at Trees for Cities, said: "Tree planting projects like this are dependent on the hard work of volunteers; people who are willing to come out, work hard and make a difference. The community planting day and other volunteering events have been a huge success and have helped us make a great start on this project."

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Last Updated ( Mar 21, 2012 at 12:33 PM )



 
   
 

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